施心远主编《听力教程》3-(第2版)Unit-14答案

Unit14

Section One Tactics for Listening

Part1 Spot Dictation

Make Your Child a Winner

Peak performances - moments when children (1) achieve the best that's in them - are the stuff of every parent's (2) dream. And yet most of us have seen a report card or heard a trumpet solo that (3) falls short of what our kids can (4) accomplish.

Why can some boys and girls repeatedly pull themselves to the (5) heights, while others of equal or (6) superior ability cannot? Many parents assume skill is pretty much determined by (7) natural ability; the student with the highest I.Q. will get the best grades, or the athlete with the most prowess will (8) surpass his teammates.

Genes count in determining performance, but they're not everything. The (9) edge comes from mental attitude, character and (10) strategy. There are some simple ways for parents to help their youngsters develop those (11) traits:

Find something to praise. A child who feels good

about himself (12) succeeds.

Assess your child's (13) strengths.

Encourage self-applause.

Knowing how to relax is key to (14) peak performance.

A good report card (15) posted near your daughter's mirror reminds her that she can do well and (16) reinforces the urge to repeat her success.

There are no (17) shortcuts to bringing your child to do his best. It's a (18) gradual process of support, encouragement and hard work. And those efforts (19) payoff not only in peak performance but also in (20) closer. winner relations between parent and child.

Part2 Listening for Gist

Elderly people deserve our care and respect. Too many of them are left in homes for the elderly, alone and often forgotten by their families. Or they live with their families, who then have no time to themselves.

The family placement scheme is currently providing many carers with a satisfying and important occupation. And more and more grandparents are being "adopted" by caring families.

How does the scheme operate?

Families are interviewed and carefully matched to the elderly person or persons, taking into account such things as

suitability of accommodation - special needs, children and pets, smoking, lifestyle, personality and interests. Matching is, of course, largely a matter of ensuring that the elderly person and the carer will enjoy each other's company.

After this the elderly person and the family are prepared for the placement: An introductory visit is arranged, usually in the carer's home. This means that when the placement begins the elderly person and family have met each other.

Carers are paid on a weekly basis to cover expenses.

Exercise

Directions: Listen to the passage and write down the gist and the key words that help you decide.

1.This passage is about the family placement scheme and how it operates.

2. The key words are elderly people, care, respect, scheme, adopted, caring families, interviewed, matched, suitability, matching, ensuring, enjoy company, introductory visit, caring home, paid, cover expenses.

Section Two Listening Comprehension

Part 1 Dialogue

Tree Climbers of Pompeii*

Sara: Urn ... It's another one of my adventures as a tourist, urn ... finding out things you really didn't expect to find out when you went to the place! I went to Pompeii and of course what you go to Pompeii for is er ... the archaeology.

Liz: To see the ruins.

Sara: To see the ruins. And I was actually seeing the ruins but urn ... suddenly my attention was caught by something else. I was just walking round the comer of a ruin, into a group of trees, pine trees, and I was just looking at them, admiring them and suddenly I saw a man halfway up this tree, and I was looking at him so all I could see was his hands and his feet and he was about 20 or 30 feet up. I thought, "Goodness, what's going on here? Has he got a ladder or hasn't he?" So I walked round to see if he had a ladder. No, he had just gone straight up the tree.

Liz: He'd shinned up* the tree.

Sara: He'd shinned up the tree. Like a monkey, more or less, except he was a rather middle-aged monkey ... He was er ... he was all of 50 and (Dh God), what's going on here?

Anyway, I walked a bit further and saw other people

either up trees or preparing to go up trees, and then I noticed a man standing there directing them. A sort of foreman, and began to wonder what on earth was going on, and then on the ground I saw there were all these polythene* buckets and they were full of pine cones* and of course what they were doing was collecting pine cones, and I thought, "Well, how tidy of them to collect pine cones to stop the ruins being urn ... made urn ... made untidy with all these things." Then I saw there was a lorry ... full of pinecones ... This was getting ridiculous ...

They were really collecting them in a big way. So I urn ...

asked the er ... foreman what was going on and he said, "Well you know urn ... pine nuts are extremely sought after and valuable in the food industry in Italy."

Liz: For food (Yeah). Not fuel! I thought you were going to say they were going to put (bum) them on a fire. Yes. Sara: Well, they might bum the er ... cones when they've finished with them but inside these cones are little white

things like nuts and er ... I realized that they're used in

Italian cooking quite a lot in er ... there's a particular sauce that goes with spaghetti em ... from Geneva, I think,

called "pesto*" in which these nuts are ground up and of

course they they ... come in cakes and sweets and things

like that.

Liz: So it’s quite a delicacy.

Sara: It's quite a delicacy. And of course I'd never thought of how they actually got them 'cos you can't imagine having a pine nut farm. So what he said happens is that private firms like his buy a license off the Italian State for the right to go round places like Pompeii - archaeological sites and things - and systematically collect all the pine cones that come off the trees and similarly in the ... in the forests.

Liz: And of course they have to go up the tree because by the time it's fallen food isn't any good.

Sara: That's right. They're pulling them down and he said they were very good at urn ... recognizing which ones were

ready and which ones were a bit hard and etc, and each of

them had a sort of stick with a hook at the end which they

were using to pull the pines off ... off the trees but clearly

it wasn't enough to sit around and wait till they fell down.

You ... you had to do something about it. There they were.

So that was er ... the end of my looking at the ruins for

about half an hour. I was too fascinated by this er .. ,

strange form of er ... agriculture.

Liz: Well, what you don't intend to see is

always the most interesting.

Sara: Much more interesting.

Exercise

Directions: Listen to the dialogue and choose the best answer to each of the following questions.

1.A

2.B

3.D

4.B

5.C

6.A

7.A

8.D

Part 2 Passage

Windmills

1.Now, windmills are poised to break into a new frontier: the

modern city center, often fused into building designs and barely noticeable from a distance.

2.Lighter, quieter, and often more efficient than their rural

counterparts, they take advantage of the extreme turbulence and rapid shifts in direction that characterize urban wind

patterns.

3.But so far, the current models are being designed more for

public or commercial buildings than for private homes, and the smallest weigh roughly 200 kilograms.

4.The recent liberalization of European energy markets also

has allowed customers to choose what kind of sustainable energy they want to purchase, with wind energy among the most popular.

5.In the classrooms down below, there's no palpable sign that a

steel windmill up above is continually feeding kilowatts to the local power grid.

The graceful wooden windmills that have broken up the flat Dutch landscape for centuries a national symbol like wooden shoes and tulips - yielded long ago to ungainly metal-pole wind turbines.*

Now, windmills are poised to break into a new frontier: the modem city center, often fused* into building designs and barely noticeable from a distance.

Though still in its teething stages, the "urban turbine" is a high-tech windmill designed to generate energy from the rooftops of bustling cities.

Lighter, quieter, and often more efficient than their rural counterparts, they take advantage of the extreme turbulence* and rapid shifts in direction that characterize urban wind

patterns.

Prototypes* have been successfully tested in several Dutch cities, and the city government in the Hague has recently agreed to begin a large-scale deployment in 2003.

These very visible projects also improve the public profile of wind power, making energy companies look environmentally correct.

Current models cost US$8,000 to US$12,000, and can generate between 3,000 and 7,000-kilowatt hours of electricity per year. A typical Dutch household uses 3,500 kilowatt hours per year, while in the United States, this figure jumps to around 10,000 kilowatt hours.

But so far, they are being designed more for public or commercial buildings than for private homes. The smallest of the current models weigh roughly 200 kilograms and can be installed on a roof in a few hours without using a crane.

Germany, Finland and Denmark have also been experimenting with the technology, but the ever-practical Dutch are natural pioneers in urban wind power, mainly because of the lack of space there.

The Netherlands, with 16 million people crowded into a country twice the size of Slovenia, is the most densely populated

in Europe.

The scarcity of land also is felt in the countryside, forcing traditional wind farms to seek new locations. Offshore wind farms are more common, but remain pricey and difficult to service.

Various European initiatives to increase the viability* of sustainable energy also have given the urban turbine a boost, leading to heightened interest in "zero-energy" buildings that generate their own power.

The recent liberalization of European energy markets also has allowed customers to choose what kind of sustainable energy they want to purchase, with wind energy among the most popular.

Windmills are usually noisy, though the latest models are considered quiet enough to blend into the background noise that already exists in the urban environment.

In the Dutch town of Ede, whose old wooden mill now generates more tourism than energy, the new windmill on the roof of the ROVC Technical School hardly makes a whisper as its blades spin in a brisk winter breeze. If the wind is blowing really hard, you can usually hear it a little bit on the roof.

But in the classrooms down below, there's no palpable* sign

that a steel windmill up above is continually feeding kilowatts to the local power grid. Nor is there the kind of visual blight* often associated with modern windmills.

But in the classrooms down below, there’s no palpable sign that a steel windmill up above is continually feeding kilowatts to the local power grid. Nor is the kind of visual blight often associated with modern windmills.

Meanwhile, projects are under way to use the windmills to generate power for lifeboats, streetlights, and portable generators.

A: Pre-listening Question

Have you ever seen the windmill? And which country is noted for its windmills?

Holland, I think, is the country noted for windmills. We seldom have the chances to see the real ones, but sometimes we can find them in some amusement parks.

B: Sentence Dictation

Directions: Listen to some sentences and write them down. You will hear each sentence three times.

C: Detailed Listening

Directions: Listen to the passage and choose the best answer to complete each of the following sentences.

1.D

2.C

3.A

4.A

5.D

6.C

7.A

8.B

D: After-listening Discussion

Directions: listen to the passage again and discuss the following questions.

1. Though still in its teething stages, the "urban turbine" is a high-tech windmill designed to generate energy from the rooftops of bustling cities. Lighter, quieter, and often more efficient than their rural counterparts, they take advantage of the extreme turbulence* and rapid shifts in direction that characterize urban wind patterns. These very visible projects also improve the public profile of wind power, making energy companies look environmentally correct. Various European initiatives to increase the viability* of sustainable energy also have given the urban turbine a boost, leading to heightened interest in "zero-energy" buildings that generate their own power.

2.(open)

Section Three NEWS

News Item 1

News of Michael Jackson's sudden death spread quickly. In his hometown of Gary, Indiana fans held a candlelight vigil and created a makeshift shrine outside his childhood home.

In other communities around the U.S., people gathered in groups to sing Jackson songs, dance and recount the pop icon's high-profile life. Images of Michael Jackson singing and dancing were broadcast around the world. Newspapers also covered their front pages with headlines of the singer's death.

In Japan, where the pop star was hugely popular, fans were looking forward to being able to see him perform in public again. He had scheduled a series of 50 concerts starting July 13 in London.

Despite the controversies, Jackson's music had mass crossover appeal in many cultures. In African nations like Kenya, where his music and videos were popular, there were feelings of loss.

Other Jackson fans say the massive outpouring of tributes proves the pop singer will go down in history alongside Elvis Presley and the Beatles as one of the biggest pop sensations of all time.

A: Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary.

This news item is about the reactions of michel jackson’s fans to his sudden death.

B: Directions: Listen to the news again and complete the following passage.

In his hometown of Gary, Indiana fans held a candlelight vigil and created a makeshift shrine outside his childhood home. In other places around the U.S., people gathered in groups to sing Jackson songs, dance and recount his l ife.

In Japan fans are looking forward to return tour, a series of 50concerts starting July 13 in London.

In African nations like Kenya, there were f eelings of loss.

Other Jackson fans think that Michel Jackson, Elvis Presley and the Beatles are the most influential pop stars of all time. News Item 2

Performing artists and politicians paid a rousing tribute to abolitionist Sojourner Truth, whose bust was unveiled Tuesday.

Several female personalities attended the ceremony, including Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a co-sponsor of the measure to put Truth's likeness on permanent display.

Sojourner Truth was born into slavery in 1797. She escaped

in the early 19th century. And although she was unable to read or write, she delivered stirring speeches promoting the abolition of slavery and women's voting rights.

First Lady Michelle Obama said she thinks Sojourner Truth would be proud of the strides black and white women have made. "I hope that Sojourner Truth would be proud to see me, a descendent of slaves, serving as the first lady of the United States of America,"

Truth's bust will not stand alone. She will eventually be joined by a statue of Rosa Parks, a civil rights icon who refused to give up her seat at the front of the bus when, during segregation, blacks had to sit at the back.

A: Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary.

This news item is about the ceremony in which Sojourner Truth’s bust was unveiled.

B: Directions: Listen to the news again and answer the following questions.

1. She was an abolitionist.

2. Because she delivered stirring speeches promoting the abolition of slavery and women’s voting right.

3. Her bust was unveiled on Tuesday.

4. Performing artists and politicians attended the ceremony.

5. She would be proud of the strides black and white women have made.

6. A statue of Rosa Parks will stand beside Truth’s bust.

News Item 3

This week, apple computer began shipping the latest version of its operating system, called Snow Leopard. But for the vast majority of the world’s personal computers, the big upgrade event comes next month, when Microsoft begins shipping the newest version of its operating system, Window 7.

I spoke with Robert Strohmeyer, senior editor at PC World magazine, about the latest iteration of the windows franchise.

“If you are running Windows XP now, you're going to see a tremendous number of differences, because of course many of the graphical effects of Windows Vista are now included in Windows 7 as well. However, you get those graphics improvements without the system resource slowdowns that had come with them previously. And it has a feature called Jump Lists that makes it easier to navigate through the menus in a contextual way, so that what you are looking for is grouped

together with things that you would automatically associate with them.

A: Directions: Listen to the news item and complete the summary.

This news item is about the newest version of Microsoft’s operating system, Windows 7.

Exercise B

Directions: Listen to the news again and complete the following passage.

Next month, Microsoft will start shipping an upgraded version of its operating system, Window 7.

There are a tremendous number of differences between Windows XP and Window 7.

Many of the graphical effects of Windows Vista are now included in Windows 7 without the system slowdowns.

Windows 7 has a feature called Jump Lists that makes it easier for users to navigate through the menus in a contextual way. It can also group what users are looking for with things that they would automatically associate with.

Section Four Supplemmentary Exercises

Part 1 Feature Report

Wind, Solar Could Play Bigger Roles in Future US Energy

Mix

U.S. climate change legislation now before Congress would mandate that by 2020, 15 to 20 percent of the nation's electricity supply would come from renewable sources like wind and solar.

Currently wind and solar contribute only about 2 percent, with hydropower providing an additional 6 percent.

In the White House Rose Garden Thursday, President Obama urged Congress to pass the bill that he said would create incentives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, spark a clean energy transformation of the economy and create millions of green jobs.

Can these renewable sources meet the nation's energy needs? A new report from the Pew Center on Global Climate Change finds that wind and solar can be a major source of electricity in the United States. But the report says that will happen only if the United States adopts new policies that promote renewable energy and put a price on climate-changing carbon emissions.

Paul Komor, professor of environmental studies at the

University of Colorado and author of the Pew report, says there's theoretically enough sun and wind to meet all U.S. energy needs. The good news, he says, is that the country is already tapping these unlimited resources.

Most of the electricity the United States produces comes from fossil fuels - such as coal or natural gas - which are abundant and still relatively cheap. A major barrier to adding wind or solar is cost, although wind has become more competitive with natural gas.

According to the Pew Center report, if wind is to supply 20 percent of the U.S. energy needs, it will require investments in transmission-line construction of $3-4 billion per year, or a 40 to 50 percent increase over current expenditures, to deliver electricity from remote wind turbines to urban users.

Another issue, says Komor, is variability. Wind and solar power are both subject to natural conditions.

The climate change legislation passed by the House of Representatives would also establish a federal renewable electricity standard. It would require utilities in every state to get 15 to 20 percent of their electric power from renewables by 2020. It also puts in place a system of trading credits that would allow states to buy renewably generated power to meet the

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